Month: October 2018

Avoiding hidden dangers in retirement

Make sure you don’t run out of money or face a reduced standard of living

Increasingly, more and more pensioners are keeping much of their pension invested after they retire. This means they’re faced with two very different risks when deciding what to do with their savings in retirement in a world of ‘pension freedoms’. Since April 2015, people who reach retirement have had much greater flexibility over how they use their pension funds to pay for their later years.

Wealth preservation

Reducing Inheritance Tax means taking action now

Without professional advice and careful financial planning, HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) can become the single largest beneficiary of your estate following your death. A recent survey about Inheritance Tax (IHT)[1] shows that wealthy Britons over the age of 45 are either ignoring estate planning solutions or they have forgotten about the benefits these can provide. Only 27% of those surveyed have taken financial advice on IHT planning, despite all of them having a potential IHT liability.

Frugal habits

ow our spending might change in retirement

Living longer is a good thing, right? Most people would probably agree with that. Living longer means more time to enjoy all the world has to offer and more time to spend with cherished family and friends – and everyone wants at some point to stop working and enjoy their retirement.

Funding your future lifestyle

Think about the level of risk you might be willing to take with your hard-earned cash

We all dream of a more prosperous financial future, but how do you turn this into a reality? With interest rates on savings accounts stuck at low levels, it’s difficult to get any real growth on your money over the long term.

Will you make provision for all that you hold dear?

Getting your affairs in order and planning what you want to pass on to loved ones

Writing a Will may seem daunting – and with everything else we should be thinking about, it becomes just another chore on the to-do list. However, getting your affairs in order and planning what you want to pass on to loved ones – whether it’s while you’re alive or after you’ve passed away – is really important. Not only does it mean that your wishes can be carried out, but it can also help reduce the emotional and financial burden on loved ones at an already difficult time.

Pensions and Divorce

Breaking up is hard to do!

Divorce and pensions are very significant. A pension could be a couple’s most valuable matrimonial asset, in some cases worth more than the equity in the family home. As such, it is important that pensions are considered in the financial settlement if a couple decides to divorce or dissolve their registered civil partnership. All the money you’ve saved into it (except for your basic State Pension) will be taken into account when your assets are divided.

SIPP into your future

Extra flexibility over your pension savings in retirement

It’s never too early – or too late – to start saving for your future. With retirement planning, it is important to take into account the fact we’re all living longer. Couple that with the fact that the cost of living continues to rise, and the value of the State Pension continues to dwindle – this provides a very strong case for starting to save early for your future.

Investing in your child’s future

Without planning ahead, the cost can be a huge money sink

While many parents value the standard of education offered by independent schools or universities, the costs can be daunting. However, with careful planning, it may be possible to avoid a huge outstanding student loan or tax burden.

Cash stash

Study exposes a whole host of financial secrets

It’s bad news for romantics, according to the latest annual research[1] into the retirement aspirations and financial planning of UK couples aged 40 and over. This identifies that nearly one in three couples (31%) have secret savings or investments that they have deliberately started without telling their partner or spouse. And it’s not just a few pounds, as 7% admit to hiding savings of over £50,000.